Co-rex-ions (a thoughtful read)

Originally posted on What's In John's Freezer?:

This post is solely my opinion; not reflecting any views of my coauthors, my university, etc, and was written in my free time at home. I am just putting my current thoughts in writing, with the hope of stimulating some discussion. My post is based on some ruminations I’ve had over recent years, in which I’ve seen a lot of change happening in how science’s self-correcting process works, and the levels of openness in science, which are trends that seem likely to only get more intense.

That’s what this post ponders- where are we headed and what does it mean for scientists and science? Please stay to the end. It’s a long read, but I hope it is worth it. I raise some points at the end that I feel strongly about, and many people (not just scientists) might also agree with or be stimulated to think about more.

I’ve…

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The Early Holocene Survival of Late Pleistocene Megafauna in the Americas

Originally posted on GeorgiaBeforePeople:

Most Pleistocene species of North American megafauna stopped occurring in the fossil record about 12,000 calender years ago.  It is remarkable how consistently the latest terminal radiocarbon dates of Pleistocene megafauna cluster around this time boundary.  Specimens that date to younger than this boundary are always questioned and resubmitted for another round of radiocarbon dating till a more believable result is attained, or they are dismissed as “contaminated” samples.  One notable exception to this rule was the discovery that mammoths survived on the Pribiloff Islands located between Siberia and Alaska until about 4000 calender years ago.  (See:http://markgelbart.wordpress.com/2013/09/15/the-late-extinction-of-the-pribiloff-island-mammoths/).  Another accepted exception are some of the fossils of dwarf ground sloths found on Carribean islands.  They also date to just a few thousand years ago.  However, these late survival sites are considered special cases explained by the isolation of islands.  The consistent terminal radiocarbon dates on the mainland suggested to scientists…

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The Mermaid

Originally posted on Zygoma:

As you may already know, I’ve been doing a lot of work on a mermaid specimen in the collections of the Horniman Museum & Gardens over the last few years.

The upshot of all that activity is that I have a paper written in a journal that will be hitting the bookshelves any day now. As you may have heard me say before, the specimen is not made of a monkey attached to a fish – I know that after undertaking painstaking examination of the specimen using CT scanning equipment and DNA sampling and good old fashioned anatomical investigation.

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Instead it appears to be a real creature of uncertain taxonomic affiliation. The teeth suggest a link to the Wrasse family, the tail to the Carp and the torso to no known living group, so I have designated this specimen as the type for its species and have named it Pseudosiren paradoxoides

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