African Hunting Dogs Lived in North America during the Middle Pleistocene

GeorgiaBeforePeople

The African hunting dog (Lycaon pictus meaning painted wolf) stars in many nature documentaries, but few people are aware that close relatives of this species formerly lived across Eurasia and even into North America.  At least 2 different species occurred in North America during the middle Pleistocene between ~1.5 million BP-~300,000 BP.  Fossil remains of Xenacyon lycaonoides were excavated from 2 sites in Alaska and 1 in the Yukon.  The first paleontologist who looked at these specimens misidentified them as dhole (Cuon alpinus) teeth, but a more recent examination of the dentition determined they belonged to a canid more closely related to African hunting dogs.  These scientists also examined the only other dhole fossils found in North America (from San Josecitos Cave in Mexico) and did confirm that identification.  The other American species of canid closely related to the African hunting dog was Xenacyon texanus, and it’s…

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About George Crawford

archaeologist, archer, primitive technologist, and wannabee musician ... mostly
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