Pleistocene Megafauna Wallows and Southern Appalachian Bogs

Interesting thoughts ahead, or jump to the associated paper here: http://www.parks.ca.gov/?page_id=23566

GeorgiaBeforePeople

The wallowing, trampling, and foraging of Pleistocene megafauna probably maintained the open character of mountain bogs in the southern Appalachians during the Ice Ages.  Bogs were common natural environments during moist interstadials when cool temperatures reduced evapotranspiration rates and total precipitation increased.  Bogs occurred near the headwaters of mountains rivers and upper piedmont streams on flat poorly drained sites.  Boggy communities were “embedded” in mixed forests of pine, spruce, oak, and beech; and they provided a diverse array of habitats for wildlife.  Beavers created some bogs by damming streams.  The backwaters flooded depressions created by the wallowing activities of mastodons, horses, bison, peccaries, and possibly the extinct stag-moose (Cervalces scotti).  Scientists don’t know whether Cervalces scotti wallowed or not–some species of deer such as the present day moose wallow while other species do not.  Abandoned beaver ponds succeed to wet meadow communities consisting of herbs, grass, and sedge; thus…

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About George Crawford

archaeologist, archer, primitive technologist, and wannabee fiddler...mostly
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