More About the Lower Younger Dryas Boundary

IMPLICATIONS FROM CHEMICAL, STRUCTURAL AND MINERALOGICAL STUDIES OF MAGNETIC MICROSPHERULES FROM AROUND THE LOWER YOUNGER DRYAS BOUNDARY (NEW MEXICO, USA)

Andronikov et. al. 2016

Spherules_2016

Printed in the Swedish Society for Anthropology and Geography

ABSTRACT. Hollow magnetic microspherules from along the lower Younger Dryas boundary (c. 12.9 ka BP) in New Mexico (USA) were studied using scanning electron microscopy, electron probe microanalysis, X-ray diffraction, and laser-ablation inductively coupled-plasma mass spectrometry methods. The shell of the microspherules (10–15% of the spherule’s diameter) displays dendritic surface textures, which are likely due to quenching during rapid cooling of molten material. Structurally, multiple single-magnetite crystals attached together form the bulk of the microspherules. Iron dominates the microspherules’ composition (90% FeOtot), Mn is the second most abundant element (up to 0.4% MnO), Al is detected in low concentrations (<0.30% of Al2O3). Among the trace elements, the rare earth elements display slightly fractionated patterns with concentrations of 0.1– 1.0× CI chondrite. The microspherules contain elevated concentrations of Ni relative to detrital magnetite (up to 435 ppm) and very low concentrations of Ti (down to 5
ppm). Chemical, structural and mineralogical features of the microspherules do not contradict the existing models of the formation during ablation while a meteoroid goes through the Earth’s atmosphere. Elevated concentrations of the magnetic microspherules in sediments can be a stratigraphic marker for the lower Younger Dryas boundary in North America.

Key words: magnetic microspherules, trace elements, Younger Dryas

Download the article by clicking the link below.

Microspherules_2016

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About George Crawford

archaeologist, archer, primitive technologist, and wannabee musician ... mostly
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