The Lubbock Lake Fossil Site

George Crawford:

Some observations from a afar about Lubbock Lake. Just a short ways downstream from us lies a site similar, and probably culturally connected to, the Clovis site. Although we disagree with a few points in Dr. Johnson’s work, overall, it is a great contribution to the work on the Southern High Plains.

250px-TXMap-doton-Lubbock

Originally posted on GeorgiaBeforePeople:

Lubbock Lake was a natural 10 acre body of water located within the city limits of Lubbock, Texas.  Wind blown sediment formed a barrier that choked the flow of a stream, creating this lake.  Springs fed the stream and were part of the headwaters of the Brazos River system.   During the 19th century Lubbock Lake served as a favorite watering hole for cowboys and their cattle, and Indians had utilized these wetlands for at least 13,000 years.  But during the 1930s too many residents had dug wells in the vicinity causing the water table to drop and the lake to dry up.  City workers dug into the dry lake bed in a failed attempt to establish a reservoir.  However, vertebrate fossils and artifacts were found in the spoil piles of dirt dug by the engineers.  Scientists began studying this locality.  Material from this site was the first ever to be radio-carbon dated. …

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How Far South did Polar Bears (Ursus maritimus) Range During the Ice Age?

George Crawford:

Interesting thoughts about Polar Bear ranges in the Late Pleistocene.

Originally posted on GeorgiaBeforePeople:

Almost the entire present day range of the polar bear was uninhabitable for this species during most of the Ice Age.  The ice was too thick then, even for species adapted to arctic conditions.  Polar bear ranges shifted south.  Favorable habitat existed between the mile high Laurentide Ice Sheet and the Atlantic Ocean, and polar bears likely wandered along a strip of the Atlantic Seaboard now submerged by rising sea level.  I hypothesize they occurred as far south as what today is the continental shelf off the coast of South Carolina.

Map of North America during the Last Glacial Maximum.  Polar bears probably ranged on a narrow strip of the Atlantic Seaboard off the coast of what’s now Nova Scotia and Maine to as far south as what today is South Carolina during the height of the Ice Age.  Note the narrow strip of land between the ice sheet and the…

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The Giant Short-Faced Bear (Arctodus simus) was not as Bizarre as Originally Thought

George Crawford:

Interesting updates about everyone’s favorite Pleistocene bear. Not quite what we first thought but still a formidable predator.

Originally posted on GeorgiaBeforePeople:

Scientists first described the giant short-faced bear as an unusually long-limbed bruin with a shortened catlike face.  Some proposed this species outran prey, much like a cheetah does.  However, later studies determined it was not a particularly fast runner but was instead built for endurance.  Nevertheless, these descriptions suggested a very bizarre kind of bear.  But now, the most recent and thorough study of the short-faced bear’s anatomy upends much of what was previously thought about this bear. Paleontologists, led by Borja Figuerida, compared skeletons of the giant short-faced bear with those of 56 different species of carnivores including all living species of bear.  In all they looked at 411 specimens.  They believe the giant short-faced bear did not sport much of a different appearance than any living species of bear, though it was very large. The legs were not unusually long.  They claim the assumption of a bear with…

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Remembering Charles Darwin

Originally posted on Bearly:

“If I had my life to live over again, I would have made a rule to read some poetry and listen to some music at least once every week.”

Charles Darwin

CharlesToday we celebrate Charles Darwin’s 206th birthday. He certainly was one of the brightest scientists walking the Earth, whether you believe in his hallmark observations and conclusions on evolution or not.

He was also a remarkable human.

This is what he wrote to his future wife Emma Wedgwood, his first cousin:

“I think you will humanize me, and soon teach me there is greater happiness, than building theories, and accumulating facts in silence and solitude”.

Amen.

By the way, Charles did not consider himself an atheist, in the sense of denying the existence of God…

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Scientists give Religion too much Respect

George Crawford:

I don’t normally get political here but I wanted to reblog this interesting soap box rant from a fellow prehistory blogger. It will probably offend those of you easily offended but I certainly feel his pain. The frustration of dealing with with the crazy, whether it is from religious fundamentalists or random people wanting to censor the things that offend THEM. Try to read it with an open mind.

Originally posted on GeorgiaBeforePeople:

Warning: I’m standing on my soap box today.  This blog article might offend Christians, Jews, Muslims, mentally disabled people, the LGBT community, and Native Americans.

I was having a hard time understanding a recent news report on National Public Radio.  The story was about opposition to the execution of a mentally disabled man in Georgia.  I couldn’t figure out what the hell mentally disabled meant.  When I think of the disabled, I think of someone like my wife who can’t walk.  Finally, I remembered mentally disabled was the politically correct term for retarded.  Politically correct fascists have declared the word, retarded, to be offensive and derogatory.  I don’t understand how calling someone mentally disabled could be any less offensive than referring to them as retarded.  Public figures are so afraid now of offending certain groups of people they use confusing terms that just muddy communication.  Another example is the ban…

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Revisiting the Vero Beach Mammoth

We, at the Clovis site, have a tie to Vero Beach through the work of Dr. Elias Sellards.  Much of his work in New Mexico was forty years later but we owe a great debt to his research out here.

Mastodon bone inscribed with image of a mastodon shown by amateur collector James Kennedy of Vero Beach, Florida, NOT A SMITHSONIAN SPECIMEN.

Detail of the mammoth engraving on the unidentified megafauna bone.  Click the image to link to the earlier article.

I hope we find more paleoindian art as it is mysterious to me why there is so little in the Americas.

rouffignac

Compare the Vero Beach mammoth to these from Grotte de Rouffignac, France. Striking similarity in the simple depiction of a mammoth family.

Another fine mammoth depiction from ca 14,000 years ago.

Another fine mammoth depiction from ca 14,000 years ago in the Grotte de Rouffignac.  Maybe the French were already raising the bar in art.

 

References:

 

Lepper, Bradley

“Mammoth Engraved on Bone from Florida,” Mammoth Trumpet (27) 1 January 2012

 

Sellards, E.H.

“Human Remains and Associated Fauna from the Pleistocene of Florida,” Florida State Geological Survey 1916.