Appreciate Your Museums While They’re Around

Here are a few facts on this fun graphic.  Print and share!

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Suzanne Eckert Lecture; Telling their story through clay

Upcoming lecture at ENMU.

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Bison antiquus… in 3D!

When Dr. Selden was scanning pottery and artifacts from the collections earlier this year he took time to record a few of the spectacular bones from our many kills at the Clovis site. Here is a movable 3D scan of a partial Bison antiquus skull found in Clovis context.  If that’s not interesting, I don’t know what interesting is.

Thanks to Robert “Zac” Selden for sharing this data with our blog.

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Near Fort Sumner, New Mexico Next Week? Why not visit the Bosque Redondo Memorial for some food and history?

It’s a remarkable and important place in American history. I would suggest it as a visit by anyone traveling in the West. This special event will give even more perspective.

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http://www.bosqueredondomemorial.com/

 

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Can We expect to Find Ice-Age Artifacts in the Newly Melting Ice?

Our friends at Secrets of the Ice have some answers…

The melting of mountain ice in recent years has led to the recovery of artefacts dating back to the Stone Age. The finds appear to be getting older and older as the ice melts back. This begs the question: How old can the artefacts from the ice actually get? Is it possible that future melting could reveal finds that date back to the last Ice Age?

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Head over to their website for more information in this ever-growing topic. There’s even a photo of our old field colleague Craig Lee with the damaged, but preserved Yellowstone dart that dates back to beyond 10,000 B.P.

http://secretsoftheice.com/how-old/

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Pleistocene Pecans (Carya illinoinensis)

Thoughts about Pleistocene pecans.

GeorgiaBeforePeople

The pecan tree is 1 of 17 species of hickory trees.  Hickories are native to North America and Asia and formerly occurred in Europe, but Ice Ages, beginning about 2.5 million years ago, wiped them out there.  European mountains have an east to west orientation, while American mountains are oriented north to south.  Hickories prefer temperate climates, and the east-west mountains blocked their retreat in Europe during glacial expansions.  This explains why hickories and so many other tree species survived Ice Ages in North America but not in Europe.

Evidence of fossil pollen grains suggests hickory trees grew alongside dinosaurs during the late Cretaceous, though the oldest fossil hickory nut dates to about 34 million years ago.  Most early hickory species had thin shells, but they evolved thicker shells about 38 million years ago in response to the evolution of tree squirrels.  Squirrels love the nutrient rich nuts, so hickories evolved…

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Preprint of 3D Data Paper for Clovis Artifacts from the Gault Site available on SocArXiv — SELDEN3D

Preprint of 3D scan data for selected artifacts from the Gault Site (41BL323) in Central Texas, USA, available on SocArXiv.

via Preprint of 3D Data Paper for Clovis Artifacts from the Gault Site available on SocArXiv — SELDEN3D

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Preprint of 3D Data Paper for Clovis Artifacts from Blackwater Draw National Historic Landmark available on SocArXiv — SELDEN3D

Preprint of 3D scan data for selected artifacts from Blackwater Draw National Historic Landmark (LA3324), New Mexico, USA available on SocArXiv.

via Preprint of 3D Data Paper for Clovis Artifacts from Blackwater Draw National Historic Landmark available on SocArXiv — SELDEN3D

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Solar Astronomy at Stonehenge — Wessex Guided Tours

Originally posted on Stonehenge News and Information: Most people are aware that Stonehenge is somehow aligned to the annual movements of the Sun. Each year thousands of pilgrims, druids and party-goers gather in celebration, hoping to witness the most famous of these – the Summer Solstice Sunrise on June 21st. At this time of year,…

via Solar Astronomy at Stonehenge — Wessex Guided Tours

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Reality of Climate Fluxuation

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I saw this on a young anthropologist’s Tumblr page this morning and really appreciated it.  I could not find an author’s name to credit it properly so I hope someone can point me in the right direction.  A pen name of XKCD was associated with it.

I like timelines when they are well done and this one packs a good deal of perspective and information into a fairly simple graphic.  Read closely.  I have “educated” folks argue that the data are not “real” or that this sort of fluxuation just happens all the time but unfortunately, they tend to come without any actual facts or knowledge of the subject.  Do not get your science from an entertainment television channel!

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Heinrich Events Caused Annual Mass Whale Strandings during the Pleistocene and early Holocene

Interesting Big Picture on climate (not politician driven either).

GeorgiaBeforePeople

Despite the universal chorus of politicized alarmists, earth is currently experiencing a period of relative climatic stability compared to the dramatic climatic fluctuations that occurred during the Pleistocene.  The presence of vast ice sheets in the northern hemisphere contributed to this ancient climatic instability.  Glaciers blocked rivers, creating huge glacial lakes.  Warm spikes in average annual temperatures weakened the ice dams and caused breaches.  Massive outflows of frigid fresh water and icebergs periodically flooded into the North Atlantic, shutting down thermohaline circulation.  The gulf stream normally carries tropically heated water into the North Atlantic, and this keeps overall climate temperate, but after torrents of cold fresh water stopped this process, average annual temperatures dropped as much as 15 degrees F in less than a decade, precipitating severe stadial conditions that lasted for hundreds or even thousands of years. These meltwater pulses are known as Heinrich events, named after the scientist…

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3D Clovis Wrench, Shaft Straightener or Rope Tool — selden3d

While there are a number of theories regarding what this particular mammoth bone artifact from the Murray Springs site (AZ EE:8:25[ASM] [10885 B.P.]) may represent, some more plausible and well-supported than others, I certainly could not pass up the opportunity to scan it.

via 3D Clovis Wrench, Shaft Straightener or Rope Tool — selden3d

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